Time of Useful Consciousness by Jennifer Ott

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Louisa Unger, a young German woman in Post-War World II Germany kills a man in cold blood. Despite her crime, her fate is up to her – give up her countrymen for her freedom. She decides to play the loyalty card and remain in prison. During the interrogations, Louisa weaves her tale of the events by evading any real information. She relives reuniting with her estranged brother Freddy, falling in love with Kris, a former reconnaissance pilot and learning to fly to a plane. She recounts in fairy tale fashion of monsters cloaked in shadows and lessons learned by incorrigible children. Seduced into the bliss of romance and flying, Louisa fails to recognize any threat. She grows immersed in the life of a smuggler, a pilot and a lover. It is hard to come back down to earth, when soaring so high.

Review:

A novel that captures the pain, heartache, trials, and even the bit of hope and romance that so many people endured through WWII.

Even though I probably could have fallen in love with the story for Time of Useful Consciousness, I did not care for any of the characters nor was I pleased with the amount of cursing and sexual conversations and actions that were present in this novel. And because of that, I dropped the book fairly quickly.

I do have to applaud the author on her writing style because I love her use of vocabulary, and the intelligent way that she wove the story together. The only reasons that this book receives such a low rating from me, is because of the above mentioned.

I give it 2 out 5 stars and do not recommend to readers who are wanting a clean WWII novel.

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Rated:

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The Shattered Crown by J.W. Webb

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Corin an Fol, Longswordsman and ex mercenary has but one objective: retire early and settle down. Unfortunately the gods have other ideas. When Corin arrives home after many years fighting foreign wars, he finds bad news waiting for him. The High King has been murdered and his crystal crown, the Tekara, destroyed.
The Tekara is no ordinary crown. Wrought of solid crystal it contains a charm of strength that has protected the Four Kingdoms for millennia. But the Tekara is vulnerable to one thing: treachery. So when Caswallon the schemer secretly places the crown on Prince Tarin’s head he knows it will shatter, causing the realms to fall apart. He stands to gain as soon as it breaks.
Though many suspect Caswallon, who is known as a sorcerer, only one dares stand against him: Queen Ariane of Kelwyn. She is visited by her goddess in a dream who warns that Prince Tarin has fled with the shards of the Shattered Crown, and only by finding both Prince and Crown can the Four Kingdoms be saved.
After being promised gold, Corin an Fol reluctantly joins the queen’s desperate quest to salvage the missing shards. But Caswallon is on to them and already watching their every move.

Review:

The Shattered Crown is a gripping story that takes the reader on a journey through enchanted forests, magical lakes, and worlds full of creatures that would give anyone chills!

Though the story of the Tekara, Queen Ariane, and Corin an Fol is a very well desgined and well written story, there is plenty of other content that is unnecessary to the storyline. For example, the cursing is outrageous, saying every word possible numerous, numerous times (the “f” word being used most in all contexts). The sexual content is also very high in regards to both scenes and comments (Corin, the main character of whom we read most of the book’s perspective, seems to only think about sex regardless of what he is doing and makes a lot of comments about it). The blood and gore is not as high as the previously mentioned, but there is also a lot of dark magic and the antagonist is very, very evil, with the sexual scenes being him using a girl against her will.

Because everything just mentioned began to increase as the book wore on, I lost all interest in the storyline and therefore did not finish the book, so I cannot say anything else about the story. However, I will give credit to the author for his writing skills, character development, and story building as I would have probably loved the book had all of the negative content not been present. I give it 2 out of 5 stars and do not recommend it.

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Rated:

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The House on the Corner by Michael Rains

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

For a long time, Chester, we… that is, Auntie and I and William, and a whole lot of people, we only sort of felt something might be happening around us, something we weren’t really sure what it was…

When Chester visits his Uncle William’s stuffy house, he’s only trying to avoid cleaning the hall bathroom. But a single clue written on a gum wrapper may send them all on a frantic journey, across many cities and through places unknown to society, and into a strange war that no one really understands.

Review:

Honestly, I have no idea how to describe this novella, nor do I know which genre to put it in, nor even which audience it was written for. The writing seems to point to a child audience and yet the story is entirely too complex for children to comprehend, in fact, I couldn’t even follow it.

It moves along at much too fast a pace; in the ebook I received, I noticed many many grammatical errors as well as misspellings. And, I really don’t understand how this could have been published by a decently large, and well esteemed publisher.

I’ve never been this negative, nor have I ever been this speechless, in one of my reviews before, but I’m afraid that I have nothing else to say about The House on the Corner. I give it 1 out of 5 stars.

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Rated:

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Sins of the Father by Jamie Canosa

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Monsters exist. Not in closets or under the bed, but within each of us. And sometimes . . . they win.

Kidnapped. Confused. Afraid.
Ophelia wakes up to find herself an unwilling pawn in a plot for revenge.

Pain. Blood. Loyalty.
These things bind Sawyer to a promise he struggles to keep.

Sawyer doesn’t want to hurt Ophelia. Ophelia doesn’t want to be hurt. But somethings are unavoidable. What happens when trust is broken? What happens when fear and love collide?

Hearts get broken and lives get shattered when the Sins of the Father are brought to bear.

Review:

Suspenseful action. Fast moving storyline. And a smooth, detailed writing style. These are some of the aspects of Sins of the Father as we follow the life of Ophelia and Sawyer.

Honestly, I couldn’t even finish chapter one. The book opens with a party scene at college, an almost rape and cuss words used profusely. A** was used more than 5 times, d**n used twice, sh**head used once, and the “f” word used twice, and I didn’t even finish the chapter. I was probably 5 pages into the book with all of this going on so I can only imagine how much more was used through the rest of the 305 pages of this book.

I’m sorry to say that even though the storyline may be intriguing and well written, the cursing and content present is not worth that story. I can only give Sins of the Father 1 out of 5 stars and do not recommend it to any of my followers.

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Rated: *

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Checkmate Run by Allen Alexander

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

The KGB agents are vicious, and they are closing in… His odds of escaping are bleak… Will he prevail although everything is muddled in a treacherous love triangle? Whom can he trust? The inevitable checkmate could bring him freedom … or death.

Checkmate Run is an adrenaline rush of a story about a precocious young man’s deadly struggle to survive the brutal Soviet regime. Alex Loevsky is a medical student and an inspiringly rebellious poet. He becomes enmeshed in a breakneck battle against the rampant cruelty of the totalitarian state, where just the desire to think freely is nearly a crime on par with treason, and being born Jewish is more than a mere hindrance. Alex aspires to be a physician. Despite his top academic standing, he has to overcome unspoken rule that aim to restrict the number of Jews entering medical school.

His life becomes a death-dealing game of chess; he needs to remain one step ahead of his ruthless opponent–the KGB’s Second Chief Directorate–and must win the game in order to survive.

Review:

Checkmate Run is the story of the author’s own life and his escape from Russia, yet it is written in first person just like a fictional story and is extremely engaging. The way the author writes is so beautiful, reading much like poetry and allows you to visually see everything that happens throughout the book.

Unfortunately, there were many things that I didn’t care for concerning content; just in the prologue and chapter one, I counted around 5 cuss words, some very insulting, and the sexuality present actually caused me to put the book down, all before chapter 2! It was just too detailed and crossed far too many lines for my audience.

So, although I was really interested in the author’s story as well as his writing, I would have been more pleased had he left out the language and kept the sexuality at hints without showing us every little thing that happened.

So I am going to rate Checkmate Run 1 out of 5 stars and do not recommend it to any of my followers.

Rated: *