The Pharaoh’s Daughter by Mesu Andrews

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis: 

Anippe has grown up in the shadows of Egypt’s good god Pharaoh, aware that Anubis, god of the afterlife, may take her or her siblings at any moment. She watched him snatch her mother and infant brother during childbirth, a moment which awakens in her a terrible dread of ever bearing a child. Now she is to be become the bride of Sebak, a kind but quick-tempered Captain of Pharaoh Tut’s army. In order to provide Sebak the heir he deserves and yet protect herself from the underworld gods, Anippe must launch a series of deceptions, even involving the Hebrew midwives—women ordered by Tut to drown the sons of their own people in the Nile.
When she finds a baby floating in a basket on the great river, Anippe believes Egypt’s gods have answered her pleas, entrenching her more deeply in deception and placing her and her son Mehy, whom handmaiden Miriam calls Moses, in mortal danger.
As bloodshed and savage politics shift the balance of power in Egypt, the gods reveal their fickle natures and Anippe wonders if her son, a boy of Hebrew blood, could one day become king. Or does the god of her Hebrew servants, the one they call El Shaddai, have a different plan—for them all?

My Review: 

I am a huge fan of Biblical fiction novels so I am always on the lookout for new authors. So, having heard fabulous things about Mesu Andrews, I saw that The Pharaoh’s Daughter was available for review, and I thought I’d give it a shot.

Starting off, Andrews’ writing style is beautiful and I love the way that her book is outlined as well as how it flows. All of the Egyptian history and how the story focuses on the Egyptians’ way of living, as well as the Hebrews, is definitely interesting and there was much to learn. The fact that there is a “hero” on both sides is also neat.

The characters are wonderfully developed and I couldn’t put the book down for the better part of the week, however, there were a few things that I didn’t care for.

Annipe’s wedding night with her husband is a tad bit too detailed for me to comfortably recommend this novel to other Christian readers, as well as is the night before he leaves. I would have enjoyed the book better had the author simply hinted at what they were doing (like we didn’t know….) rather than actually showing the scene. Now, as a disclaimer, neither scene was explicit but still, both scenes being so close together and so equally detailed actually caused me to put the book down and not read on.

Having said this, I can only rate The Pharaoh’s Daughter 2 out of 5 stars and will be extra cautious of this author in the future.

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Rated:

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One to Ten by Carole P. Roman

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Squirrel is rushing along a tree limb when she trips, losing all her acorns into the rushing water of the river below. Angry and frustrated, she doesn’t know what to do. Her good friend, Rabbit, lends both a sympathetic ear as well as a solution. Rather than get angry, Rabbit tells her, rate the problem on a scale of one-to-ten. By identifying and realizing the true importance of the issue, the issue may not seem so overwhelming. Adorable forest creatures help the sad squirrel put everything into perspective so he does not to get stuck in a rut over something that may not be a big deal after all.

Review:

Rating our problems will often help us to evaluate how truly important that problem is, and usually upon that evaluation, we may realize that our problem wasn’t as big as we originally thought; this is the premise of our story.

Though I like the thought and originality of One to Ten: Squirrel’s Bad Day, I have to be brutally honest in the fact that I believe the author could have done better. I am a huge fan of Carole’s work, having loved each and every one of her previous books, but in reading this one I had to double check to see if she was really the author.

The way it’s written is cheesy, with all of the characters, except the squirrel, being able to talk in a sophisticated language that most kids won’t even understand(the squirrel just makes noises) and the story is jumping around so much that it’s hard to figure out who is talking (the “word bubbles” aren’t positioned correctly over the character’s head, which makes it difficult to read the book aloud if you’re like me and like to assign each character a different voice).

As I said, I love the idea of encouraging kids to rate their problems to help them look on the bright side of things, but I think that Carole could have really done a better job with this one, and I say that because of the level of esteem I hold for her as an author and for her other children’s books. I give One To Ten: Squirrel’s Bad Day 2 out of 5 stars.

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Rated:

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Legacy by Hannah Fielding

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

A troubled young journalist finds her loyalties tested when love and desire unearth dark secrets from the past.

Spring, 2010. When Luna Ward, a science journalist from New York, travels halfway across the world to work undercover at an alternative health clinic in Cadiz, her ordered life is thrown into turmoil.

The doctor she is to investigate, the controversial Rodrigo Rueda de Calderon, is not what she expected. With his wild gypsy looks and devilish sense of humour, he is intent upon drawing her to him. But how can she surrender to a passion that threatens all reason; and how could he ever learn to trust her when he discovers her true identity? Then Luna finds that Ruy is carrying a corrosive secret of his own…

Luna’s native Spanish blood begins to fire in this land of exotic legends, flamboyant gypsies and seductive flamenco guitars, as dazzling Cadiz weaves its own magic on her heart. Can Luna and Ruy’s love survive their families’ legacy of feuding and tragedy, and rise like the phoenix from the ashes of the past?

Legacy is a story of truth, dreams and desire. But in a world of secrets you need to be careful what you wish for…

Review:

Flawless writing and impeccable character building. Legacy takes the readers on a journey through the passions and desires that are aroused from the romantic Spanish culture.

Everything about this book is exquisite; stunningly captured in a way that brings not only the story to life, but also the characters and their feelings with them. It has been a very long time since I have read a book that was written this beautifully, so I am going to be giving it 5 out of 5 stars and simply giving a warning to my followers.

The romance and selective language is extremely high, with intense romance scenes and vivid comments/thoughts from characters, however, this is not an erotica novel by title, just a passionate romance (that does include a sex scene).

Absolutely stunning.

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Rated:

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Time of Useful Consciousness by Jennifer Ott

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Louisa Unger, a young German woman in Post-War World II Germany kills a man in cold blood. Despite her crime, her fate is up to her – give up her countrymen for her freedom. She decides to play the loyalty card and remain in prison. During the interrogations, Louisa weaves her tale of the events by evading any real information. She relives reuniting with her estranged brother Freddy, falling in love with Kris, a former reconnaissance pilot and learning to fly to a plane. She recounts in fairy tale fashion of monsters cloaked in shadows and lessons learned by incorrigible children. Seduced into the bliss of romance and flying, Louisa fails to recognize any threat. She grows immersed in the life of a smuggler, a pilot and a lover. It is hard to come back down to earth, when soaring so high.

Review:

A novel that captures the pain, heartache, trials, and even the bit of hope and romance that so many people endured through WWII.

Even though I probably could have fallen in love with the story for Time of Useful Consciousness, I did not care for any of the characters nor was I pleased with the amount of cursing and sexual conversations and actions that were present in this novel. And because of that, I dropped the book fairly quickly.

I do have to applaud the author on her writing style because I love her use of vocabulary, and the intelligent way that she wove the story together. The only reasons that this book receives such a low rating from me, is because of the above mentioned.

I give it 2 out 5 stars and do not recommend to readers who are wanting a clean WWII novel.

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Rated:

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The Shattered Crown by J.W. Webb

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Corin an Fol, Longswordsman and ex mercenary has but one objective: retire early and settle down. Unfortunately the gods have other ideas. When Corin arrives home after many years fighting foreign wars, he finds bad news waiting for him. The High King has been murdered and his crystal crown, the Tekara, destroyed.
The Tekara is no ordinary crown. Wrought of solid crystal it contains a charm of strength that has protected the Four Kingdoms for millennia. But the Tekara is vulnerable to one thing: treachery. So when Caswallon the schemer secretly places the crown on Prince Tarin’s head he knows it will shatter, causing the realms to fall apart. He stands to gain as soon as it breaks.
Though many suspect Caswallon, who is known as a sorcerer, only one dares stand against him: Queen Ariane of Kelwyn. She is visited by her goddess in a dream who warns that Prince Tarin has fled with the shards of the Shattered Crown, and only by finding both Prince and Crown can the Four Kingdoms be saved.
After being promised gold, Corin an Fol reluctantly joins the queen’s desperate quest to salvage the missing shards. But Caswallon is on to them and already watching their every move.

Review:

The Shattered Crown is a gripping story that takes the reader on a journey through enchanted forests, magical lakes, and worlds full of creatures that would give anyone chills!

Though the story of the Tekara, Queen Ariane, and Corin an Fol is a very well desgined and well written story, there is plenty of other content that is unnecessary to the storyline. For example, the cursing is outrageous, saying every word possible numerous, numerous times (the “f” word being used most in all contexts). The sexual content is also very high in regards to both scenes and comments (Corin, the main character of whom we read most of the book’s perspective, seems to only think about sex regardless of what he is doing and makes a lot of comments about it). The blood and gore is not as high as the previously mentioned, but there is also a lot of dark magic and the antagonist is very, very evil, with the sexual scenes being him using a girl against her will.

Because everything just mentioned began to increase as the book wore on, I lost all interest in the storyline and therefore did not finish the book, so I cannot say anything else about the story. However, I will give credit to the author for his writing skills, character development, and story building as I would have probably loved the book had all of the negative content not been present. I give it 2 out of 5 stars and do not recommend it.

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Rated:

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