Adobe Gold by Robert C. Mowry

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of my review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

He’s been dead for fifteen years. That’s what everyone believes. The truth is, that’s when Colonel Tyrone Rafter disappeared down in Mexico while on a top secret mission. After the loss of a leg and seven long years in a decrepit prison, he escapes only to learn his beloved wife, Laura, has married another.

Rafter then manifests his bitterness by foisting terror on any and all who dare cross his path as he roams the Rio Grande area south of the border. Then, one night an old padre brings word that Laura has died. Rafter starts on a quest to clean up his life, get justice for his hardships, and find his son.

He calls on his old friend, Abe Lincoln, newly elected President of the United States. Rafter once saved Lincoln’s life when the two were teenagers. Lincoln now persuades this old spy to take on one more mission—well, two, really. Can this military -hero -turned -outlaw, known to the fearful Mexican populous as El Pata Fantasma (the wooden-legged ghost), now “die” again, to be transformed forevermore into a radically new man: Parson Justine P. Stone?

My Review: 

Robert Mowry is a new-to-me-author but after reading Adobe Gold, I anxiously look forward to reading more of his novels, especially the rest of this series!

Adobe Gold is a really awesome story that illustrates God’s grace in a special way that brings to life His amazing forgiveness and mercy. The characters are well developed and well defined. The story flows beautifully, keeping you reading as the action unfolds. I enjoyed the history tidbits and the link to President Lincoln and the author did really good at keeping you informed of what time in the Civil War his book takes place.

Please bare in mind, however, that this book does take place in the Civil War and therefore there is some gun violence as well as men with drinking problems. Though none is this is overly detailed.

I give Adobe Gold 4 out of 5 stars.

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Luther and Katharina by Jody Hedlund

I received this book from the author/publisher for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Katharina von Bora has seen nothing but the inside of cloister walls since she was five. In a daring escape, Katharina finds refuge with Martin Luther and seeks his help to pair her with the noble, wealthy husband she desires.

As class tensions and religious conflicts escalate toward the brink of war, Martin Luther believes that each day could be his last and determines he will never take a wife.

As the horrors of the bloody Peasant War break out around them, the proud Katharina and headstrong Martin Luther fight their own battle for true love, in one of the greatest love stories of history.

Review:

Jody Hedlund is an incredibly talented author! Her writing all but dares you to put the book down as you read vigorously what will happen next! Her characters come alive in such a unique way and her stories always have motivation and inspiration found in the main plot.

In Luther and Katherina, Jody dives into Martin Luther’s world and brings it alive like I’ve never seen, or read. So it was definitely tense and suspenseful yet it was beautiful at the same time. The only thing that I would warn the readers on, is that Jody is a master of description, so the sexual issues that took place in this time of history are shown, yet they aren’t overly detailed. However, the violence is detailed enough to see clearly.

Nevertheless, I rate Luther and Katharina 5 out of 5 stars and will probably be reading this book again in the future!

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Devil in the Countryside by Cory Barclay

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

Devil in the Countryside is a story about the most famous werewolf investigation in history, brimming with intrigue and war, love and betrayal, and long-kept vendettas.

It’s 1588, the height of the Reformation, and a killer is terrorizing the German countryside. There are reports that the legendary Werewolf of Bedburg has returned to a once-peaceful land. Heinrich Franz, a cold and calculating investigator, is tasked with finding whomever — or whatever — the killer might be. He’ll need all the help he can get, including that of a strange hunter who’s recently stumbled into town. Though they’re after the same thing, their reasons are worlds apart.

And through it all, a priest tries to keep the peace among his frightened townsfolk, while a young woman threatens his most basic beliefs.

Review:

Exciting. Thrilling. And brimming with adventure, Devil in the Countryside is a historical suspense novel with the twist of paranormal. Because it is based on the true historical werewolf hunt, it is different than most werewolf-containing novels, though it still has it’s fair share of heart-stopping moments.

The characters are all very-well developed and so different that the story always seems to have a fresh take on the mysterious murders. There are a few instances where cursing is used frequently, as well as some sexual comments/actions that are in the bars of the small town. Because this takes place during the Reformation, there is a lot of religious talk between the Protestants and the Catholics, the fighting gets escalated between the two parties, and there is a lot of talk of “devilry” and black magic.

So overall, I really did enjoy this book and learning a bit about the werewolf hunt (because my curiosity had me reading some documentaries at the same time) and this might be a good side-read if you’re studying the time of the Reformation.

I give it 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to readers older than 15 years of age.

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Conquests: Hearts Rule Kingdoms by Emily Murdoch

I received this book from the author for the purpose of this review. All comments and opinions are entirely my own.

The Synopsis:

England, 1069.

The nation is still recovering from the Norman invasion three years earlier – and adjusting to life under its sometimes brutal new rulers.

A young girl trembles in the shadows of what was once her home.
Avis is homeless and penniless, and with no family left alive she is forced to become a ward of Richard, the Norman lord who has taken her home. But when King William decrees that Norman lords must marry Anglo-Saxon women Avis must make a terrible choice.
Either marry the repulsive Richard or take a else chance on another Norman, Melville, a man she has never met.

Soon she realizes that survival in a time of turmoil and war depends of putting aide the prejudices of the past And if she can do so, kingdoms and hearts can still be among her ‘Conquests’.

Review:

A beautiful romance that captures the trials, pain, and confusion of a noble marriage during war, but also the love, commitment, and dedication that is sometimes brewed out of arranged marriages.

I fell in love with this story from page one! Avis is an incredibly strong main character, with all of the charm, wit, and sass that could be desired to fulfil such a powerful role. Hers and Melville’s story is one that is enchanting and memorable, and also illustrates how valuable communication is in a relationship.

There is some mild language, sexual comments, thoughts, and actions (though no scenes), and the details of the war can become very gruesome. However, though these things are present, they do not come very often at all, and are mild when they are included in a scene.

Thus, I give Conquests, 4 out of 5 stars and look forward to more of the author’s work in the future.

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A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

A featured classic novel.

The Synopsis:

In 1918 Ernest Hemingway went to war, to the war to end all wars. He volunteered for ambulance service in Italy, was wounded, and twice decorated. Out of his experiences came A Farewell to Arms. Hemingway’s description of war is unforgettable. He recreates the fear, the comradeship, the courage of his young American volunteer, and the men and women he meets in Italy with total conviction. But A Farewell to Arms is not only a novel of war. In it, Hemingway has also created a love story of immense drama and uncompromising passion.

Review:

A Farewell to Arms is a classic novel that many authors, readers, and literature-loving humans greatly enjoy, not only for the story contained in the pages, but also for Hemingway’s unique way of capturing the story. Most of Hemingway’s novels are well-known and again, most are quoted often.

In this particular novel, our focus is on the Lt. and his love as they go through a brutal war in Italy. The graphics and dialogue as we read this book bring the war to life in ways that only Hemingway could do and keep us compelled to read more.

As for the content, the language usage can be very vulgar at times and the romance is very sexual. There are no scenes in which the romance is shown clearly to the reader, however the conversations that the couple has can be decently descriptive.

Overall, this book is one that possibly can only be enjoyed by fans of Hemingway’s style and I recommend it to be kept at an audience of Seniors in high school or college students. I give it 3 out of 5 stars.

 

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